Pioneering PhD Research

banner v6PhD student Ilyena Hirskyj-Douglas is co-organising a workshop on Animal Computer Interaction with Charlotte Robinson and  Clara Mancini (The Open University), and Shaun Lawson and Ben Kirman (University of Lincoln)). The design of computing technology for animals is a relatively new branch of HCI and there are many research questions being asked in this new area.  Ilyena’s research, which is showcased at http://acid.uclan.ac.uk, focusses on seeking ways for dogs to interact in natural ways with technologies and on how they can be active participants in research studies in this space.   Her most recent work is a workshop paper adapting Hart’s ladder of participation for dogs.  Previous work has used image recognition to map the direction a dog is facing to study interaction with screens.  In the near future Ilyena will be looking to recruit dog owners to assist in her work.  Contact her via the ACID website.

 

Students Win Research Paper Prize

This year’s research paper winners Thomas Tijssen and James Lemin, receiving their prize from me (sponsored by O’Reilly).

I’ve been investigating the concept of undergraduate research for a few years now. Especially the effectiveness of integrating research opportunities within the 1st year Computing undergraduate cohort, and how the introduction of a research culture enables the teaching team to engage the students and create a foundation of skills that are transferable throughout their course.

The teaching of university students at undergraduate level has conventionally mostly been about providing students with learning skills and about enabling their procurement and understanding of information. Imagine this scenario, so common in higher education: several hundred students assemble together into a big tiered lecture room, to sit an hour, sometimes longer, to listen to a one way lecture. Students are commonly expected to gain an understanding of the subject matter usually by attending these lectures and reading a body of evidence-based literature. At some stage during their academic studies (normally at the end of the academic year) it is necessary to ask them to reiterate the information handed out during those lectures, in order to assess what the student has absorbed. Often, they graduate without experiencing the practices that went into forming the specific readings they study from.

Presently, it is only when a student actually graduates they experience the development of independent inquiry, intellectual independence and knowledge creation. Engaging students in using the skills associated with research can only improve the quality of the university undergraduate experience, and improve their critical thinking.

Students who undertake CO1801 (Practitioner Skills) are required to write a research paper as one of their assignments. This module serves as a tool for students to learn and put into practice skills that will increase their employability; such as team working, adaptability, communication and research proficiency. Students have to propose a piece of experimental research, carry out their experiment, and write it up in a short journal paper format. The best papers are submitted to UClan’s Journal of Undergraduate Research, further encouraging quality of work and engagement.

 

BCS HCI DC @ UCLan

DC-logoBCS HCI Summer Doctoral Consortium

Date: 2nd June 9:00am – 4:00pm
Location: University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
Chairs: Dr Joseph ‘JoFish’ Kaye, Flickr and Yahoo! Labs, Dr Leon Watts, University of Bath
Web Site: http://www.chici.org/bcshcidc2015

What is a Doctoral Consortium?
A doctoral consortium is a one-day event where you explore your PhD topic, the practical problems of doing your research and you share your experiences in a critical but supportive context. This event will enable you to network with peers and established experts within the field of HCI while building confidence and motivating you to do even better with your research. Crucially a DC provides students with a valuable opportunity to present, discuss, and receive feedback on their work and ideas.

BCS-Funded Travel Bursaries available! Please check the web site for further info

 

Public Lecture: Jofish Kaye

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 14.09.03Joseph ‘Jofish’ Kaye, Senior Research Scientist, Flickr and Yahoo! Labs will be giving a talk titled Sharing Feelings, Photos & Passwords on Monday, 1st June 2015, 7:00pm, TVI Lecture Theatre, Adelphi Building, UCLan. Please register on EventBrite if you plan to attend at http://goo.gl/FYPRVE

Every day we make decisions about which technologies to use: what phone to buy, how to share files with collaborators, how to check your bank balance. These choices are not just about the best technology for you to use as an individual, but also about the decisions made by your colleagues, family, friends and others around you. In this talk, I’ll discuss research with over 180 participants exploring how people share passwords, how they manage their bank accounts and finances, and how they store, share and safeguard their photos, documents and data. I’ll talk about the complex moral and emotional decisions people navigate as they make these decisions, and discuss implications for the design of financial tools, next-generation password access, and tools to help us manage our data.
Jofish Kaye is a Senior Research Scientist at Flickr and Yahoo Labs. His research explores the social, cultural, and technological effects of technology on people, and how people’s decisions and behaviors can change and improve those technologies. His previous work has ranged from studies of long distant relationships and computerized smell output to visualizations of Twitter and academic publications. He is co-Chair of the CHI 2016 conference, occasionally teaches at Stanford University, and has a Ph.D in Information Science from Cornell, a Masters degree in Media Arts & Sciences and a B.S. in Cognitive Science, both from MIT.